We Still Have a Chance to Stop Kratom Prohibition – And the DEA Actually Wants to Hear Your Thoughts | Drug Policy Alliance

http://www.drugpolicy.org/blog/we-still-have-chance-stop-kratom-prohibition-%E2%80%93-and-dea-actually-wants-hear-your-thoughts?ms=2D1_1611NewsletterKratom&utm_campaign=fy17newsletter&cid=701U0000000y1Jd&spMailingID=27183648&spUserID=NDA5MjM2NTIzMjY5S0&spJobID=925556829&spReportId=OTI1NTU2ODI5S0

Please consider taking action NOW.  Send the DEA your personal letter using the link in the above article.  Tell them why they should leave kratom alone, just as it is: an unscheduled herbal supplement that many find very helpful.  The harms associated with kratom are minimal.  There have been less than 200 deaths recorded that are associated with–but not necessarily caused by–kratom use.

Please exercise your rights and privileges, and send the DEA a note today!  The next vote on the fate of kratom comes up on December 1, so time is of the essence!

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5 Comments

  1. Our government are trying to do this in NZ too … not with this herb but with Indigenous herbal remedies. At the moment they are still in the phases of trying to impede practitioners, similar to the process they took in 1907 with a Suppression Act https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tohunga_Suppression_Act_1907
    None of it makes sense!! I hope you guys see results form this!!

    Reply
    • As you point out with this excellent example, taking traditional medicine away is a good method of destabilizing a people.

      It may be argued that America is too culturally diverse to be able to call any one medicinal tradition “indigenous” and therefore protected, as is the Native American Church, which is permitted to use peyote as a sacrament.

      I would argue that the natural healing community in America (and worldwide), while very ethnically diverse, has a number of unifying elements, one of which is the study of, and the use of, medicinal herbs.

      The fact that a small handful of these herbs is psychoactive gives the DEA traction in its real agenda, which is to outlaw non-pharmaceutical medicines. This is merely a continuation of an economic agenda that began in 1910 with the Flexner Report, a project of the government that effectively cleansed the country of any and all schools of healing that did not comply with an arbitrary standard: the “Johns Hopkins model” of allopathic medicine.

      Reply
      • Ahh yes … and thats what ignited our Tohunga Suppression Act 1907 … bloody mongrels alright. Not many of our traditional heres are psychoactive … if any actually … which makes it all the more annoying … they’re talking about making it illegal to use things like kawakawa, which is native and has health benefits re heart, lungs, digestive tract etc. … Although I understand why they do it, I don’t agree with it one little inch 😉

        Reply
        • Oh well you know, kawakawa makes people feel happy, social, and relaxed…for some reason, the guvvy would prefer people be irritable and quarrelsome. It makes no sense. I suspect the next victims on the chopping block here will be kava, and perhaps valerian, which activates GABA receptors (which is what valium etc do), thus earning the name “herbal valium.” Unlike valium, it’s impossible to overdose on: take too much and you’ll puke! But, you know, it actually does work, so out out goes. I just read a paper from the lovely Centers for Disease Control targeting homeopathic remedies. Must work, if the CDC is after them.

          Reply
          • Wow…it is just criminal really, that all those things that are helpful and healing are removed … I make my own High Dose Vit C, because its cheaper basically and I have a minute income … and that was against doctors orders, who also told me there was no proof that it was beneficial … pfft … i tell you what its done more for me in a year than all their pharmaceuticals have in 2 decades! But your right … if its good for you and works you get penalised for it .. (btw the hospitals won’t allow vit C to be used on patients here… and if you purchase through a ‘reputable’ dispensary its costs between $50-$250 for approximately 3 days dosage grrr)

            Reply

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