Psychological Damage and Retraumatization

A truly phenomenal, right on the mark essay on the unique vulnerability that people with history of childhood abuse have to abusers and predators in adulthood, and asks the question, is childhood abuse the basis for mental illness?

GentleKindness

People with mental illness often have psychological damage from being subject to abuse during childhood, Then very often they are retraumatized in adulthood by ending up being the victims of predators, There are narcissistic people that prey people who have C-PTSD from childhood abuse.

Some predators actually will evaluate

you during conversations early in the relationship. They find out about your past and what the effects were. Yes,  when they were seeming to be so sweet and caring, they were pumping you for information, in order to asses how broken you were.

These predators know that broken people are easier to brainwash and drag into their world of control and manipulation. The relationships we have with people like this, retraumatize us and add to the C-PTSD we already had.

You have chosen to click on this post because the title of it struck a nerve with you. Most likely you…

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11 Comments

  1. That’s the BEST I’ve read lately, but who about when there was no childhood abuse, and the state Dept. of Mental Health Personnel are the PREDATORS?????. Missouri Mental Health Laws allows this negative abuse of adults, as proported “protection” for other “normal” persons. How do we change these abusive, discriminatory laws, is the question? Any ideal are welcome.

    Reply
    • Can you please say more about this? I’m not familiar with the laws in Missouri. From what you’ve said it sounds horrible.

      Reply
      • It’s Mo. Statuate 6 32 DMH…Which gives Mo. Dept Mental Health almost total control over anyone they can get declared as a “DANGER TO SELF OR OTHERS”. Criminals have more rights than those who get “diagnosed” as mentally ill in this state. Very curious & interesting reading, if you’re not one of it’s victims.

        Reply
          • Would LOVE to move, and ready…just as soon as I can get daughter released!!!!!!!!

            Reply
              • Thanks…Waiting for list of Doctors she’s seen, from them,…then have to show list to Doctor I’ve chosen, for him to decide which records he needs to see,…then FINALLY now have a COURT ORDER that they have to take her to him….But…they give me 4 months!!! ( They’ve had her for 4 years)…AND,… I cannot be in attendance at medical exam or evaluation. Thankfully, Doctor has choice, on whether or not THEY can/will be included in exam consultation! or excluded., as I am. .(..Kinda NOT fair?) And, I GET TO PAY…they will not allow her insurance to be billed!!!!!!! BUT, THANK GOD…I do FINALLY have the Court Order, and can FINALLY take legal action against them, if they DO NOT PRODUCE HER TO THE DOCTOR’S APPOINTMENT!!!!!

                Reply
  2. “People with mental illness often have psychological damage from being subject to abuse during childhood…” This is so true. I wonder what the percentage is.

    Reply
    • That would be a fairly easy study to do. The hard part would be teasing apart the genetic load, looking at intergenerational patterns of mental illness and abuse. For instance, my maternal grandmother had hundreds of electroshock treatments administered AT HOME for severe depression. But she came from a very strict family where she was regularly beaten, and certainly verbally abused. My mother is a classic Narcissistic Personality Disorder. She can charm the paint off a wall, then slice and dice you with her tongue. My father’s father was trafficked as a young child and suffered from MDD. He in turn abused my father, who married my mother, and their 66 year long marriage could be called apaché dancing! I couldn’t stand to be around them. I tried like hell via therapy to not pass on the generational abuse, but instead of being abusive in the usual ways, I was a workaholic absentee mother. My son is on the Autistic Spectrum just like me, my father, and his father, and he is also bipolar. So how DO we figure out what’s what? I recant my original statement!

      Reply
      • It’s interesting to read that your maternal grandmother was severely depressed. My maternal grandmother was severely depressed too–to the point of being bedridden. And my mother is a malignant narcissist, but I think it was her father that was doing the abusing. I was my mother’s scapegoat–the one she absolutely refused to love. This is definitely generational abuse. Now, my questions is, is the severe depression genetic or due to severe abuse? It’s one of those, did the chicken come before the egg or the egg before the chicken type of questions. I’ve never considered that narcissism could be genetic. I’ve always assumed that it’s a learned behavior, a way of doing things that is passed down–a family tradition of how certain things are done, so to speak.

        Reply
        • Bummer, Lynette, that you were the scapegoat. I’m the only one, so I had to be the golden girl, invisible one, and scapegoat, depending on her needs. I do think that NPD has a genetic part AND a learned behaviour part. My model, growing up, was if you wanted something that you weren’t getting, you:
          Pouted, and if that didn’t work you
          Slammed doors and cupboards, and if that didn’t work you
          Screamed
          Cried
          And last, but certainly not least….the silent treatment.

          So as a young married woman, that’s how I got what I wanted, and I forgot the extreme sultry seductress act. Oh my. It took a long time to realize how incredibly maladaptive these strategies were, and set out to find out how to be open and honest. Interestingly, that came about due to my son spinning into craziness, and I was blessed to find him a therapeutic boarding school that required monthly family group therapy. The kids really put our feet to the fire, let me tell you. I have never been so humbled as to hear from my teenager’s lips what his experience of being my kid was. Do you have kids?

          Reply

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