Mass Murder and Psychiatry – Psychiatric Times

Mass Murder and Psychiatry – Psychiatric Times

I read this article three times over, and I’m still reeling from what I think it said.

I think this article said that:

1)  People with psychiatric illnesses should be considered at risk for committing mass murders should they chance to get their hands on automatic weapons, and know how to use them;

2)  People with psychiatric disorders don’t really have disorders, but diseases;

3) People with “psychiatric diseases” are potentially vessels of evil, as the author experienced in the prison population.

I think this article itself is a vessel of evil.  Please correct me if this is just me being my usual paranoid self.  I admit to being particularly paranoid since the latest mass killing was attributed to a person on the Spectrum.  As a person on the Spectrum myself, this type of finger-pointing that stigmatizes all of us makes me want to hide even more than I customarily do.  I don’t know how that would be possible, since I only go out in public once a week, for my therapy session; but there you go.

Please help me out, Dear Readers.  Am I just being hyper-paranoid here, or has this guy really stamped the Mark of Cain on the forehead of everyone already branded with a DSM diagnosis?  Help me out here.

Mass Murder and Psychiatry – Psychiatric Times

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18 Comments

  1. D'Alta

     /  January 3, 2013

    No, you are not alone in your concern about the ramifications of this article. I have already heard how the mother of a child who is on the spectrum has felt the need to apologize for how her son’s brain works–this despite the fact that this kid takes the most amazing photographs BECAUSE of the working of his brain. The writer of the article of which you speak is creating all kinds of problems for those who happened to have a diagnosis of a brain that works differently than most others. So…it is up to all of us to advocate for the ho-hum variety of brains and for brains that make us sit up and take notice….

    Reply
    • You are totally right. We need to mobilize, get off our collective duffs and get out and educate the neurotypical public about the amazing out-of-the-box brain.

      Reply
  2. I don’t think you are being paranoid, I think this article and others like it are extremely dangerous.
    We don’t know why people do evil things but it’s not because they are on the Autism Spectrum or have a mental illness, most of us are not violent and are not planning mass murder, people without those conditions can be violent, blaming any group is based on prejudice and it’s really dangerous.
    We are normally victims, at least one victim of the last tragedy was autistic and another was disabled, why can’t people respect them by not blaming people from the same group?
    This injustice makes me angry.

    Reply
    • I’m angry too. It’s incredibly unjust and just wrong in every way, to bring this type of pseudopsychiatry to the table at a time like this. This jerk may as well have been talking about phrenology. I’m going to look into how to write to the editor of this publication. When I find out, I’ll publish it, and I hope you and everyone else will join me in expressing our dismay at this horrible injustice.

      Reply
  3. An article like that just makes the stigma 100 times worst for people with a diagnosis. Pisses me off.

    Reply
    • You are right to be pissed off. I’m looking into finding out how to write to the editor of that publication. I hope everyone here will join me and recruit others, when I publish that information here.

      Reply
  4. I read this a few days ago and thought it might be me…although I did take my med that day. 🙂 How on earth do you begin to address something like this? The tragedy is if we (those with mental illness) speak out then the author will probably twist the event into some sort of, “See – I told you so!” I know how professionals hate to speak out against each other, but that’s what is needed here. A psychiatrist or two with enough kahones to call this guy out.

    Reply
    • I think we need to write an open letter to the editor, as people who carry DSM diagnoses, explaining how this article damages us and increases the stigma that we face, not only from the general public, but now apparently from some of the psychiatric “professionals” themselves.

      Reply
  5. I agree with you, this article is terrifying. First they label us then they make us their scapegoats for everything. A proportion of us will be angry enough because of that to commit such crimes, but not most of us. This article is highly irresponsible and hateful or just plain thick. And these are the people who label us and have charge over us.

    Reply
    • I suspect that horrendous crimes like that are committed either because of a deadly cocktail of extreme delusionality facilitated by the immediate availability of deadly weapons, or (as in the case of the Columbine massacre), a sick group fantasy on the part of sane yet angry people, again fueled by the availability of assault weapons.

      I firmly believe that the entire phenomenon of young people going on sprees of mayhem is caused in large part by the nearly universal exposure to violence in video games. Kids in our times are steeped in violence from the time they can hold an object and wiggle their thumbs. And this does not even take into account television, movies, and YouTube!

      Reply
  6. Reblogged this on Open Letter to Colin Dye, Kensington Temple, Elim and commented:
    Bipolarforlife posted this disturbing article.

    Reply
  7. Thanks for sharing. I agree, this makes it that much harder to leave my safe space, called home. It’s not fair to have to be afraid of being persecuted for simply being who God made me. This article is very sad and definitely disturbing for those of us who struggle with the daily challenge of trying to be a normal functioning part of society. However, this struggle does not make us dangerous. There is a huge difference in harboring evil in your soul, as opposed to your brain simply working differently than others. Besides, I hate to tell all those “normal” people, but everyone has a little abnormality of some kind. We are all just humble enough to except it.

    Reply
  8. I have depression, but I’m also gifted in the arts. Take away one, you take away the other. I want nothing to do with guns. There’s no telling why people commit crimes such as this. Usually it isn’t one answer, but a multitude of them. It might be the influence of friends, their parents, losing a job or a significant other, some other type of illness, etc. I hate lumping people into one group. It’s true that there needs to be better care of the mentally ill but not because we’re going to go shoot up a school. There needs to be better care because we are human.

    Reply
    • You are so right. In the book “Touched With Fire” the author (whose name escapes me at the moment) lists many of the brilliant artists, authors, and musicians throughout history who would be diagnosed as mentally ill during our times. What would the world be without us? A bunch of plodding muggles, is what. I agree that with better care, more of us would live higher quality, more productive, and happier lives.

      Reply
  9. The only person I pose a danger to is myself. This another case of ‘mad, bad and dangerous to know’. The view from outside the U.S.A. – in the U.K. – is that the more guns the more death. My interest was piqued, however, by the issue of disease versus disorder. Disease speaks to me of cure. Disorder speaks to me of ‘normal’ symptoms that have, problematic consequemces. As for ‘cure’ – there’s no cure for being a member of the Human Race.

    Reply
  10. Someone

     /  January 14, 2013

    Watch “Psychiatry An Industry of Death,” it’s free online, and read the articles on the cchrsl website, and I’m not a person affiliated with that religion. But they give a history of the psychiatric industry and it’s long run goals – psychiatric stigmatization is behind most the the deplorable crimes against humanity, like murdering the Jews in WWII. The psychiatrist’s comments in this article are completely within the common psychiatric industry’s goals and belief system which rationalize their right to label people with medically unprovable “disorders.” But, I also read an article yesterday that some psychiatrists are to the point they’re blaming the pharmaceutical industry, who is also at fault, because many of the mass murders of late all relate to what the psychiatric community knew 50 years ago. Their meds were, and still are, an embarrassment. But now they’re such an enormous embarrassment that the psychiatric professionals “can’t admit to their own published findings,” according to one professional. Seven years of research into the field of psychiatric meds shows overwhelming evidence that the anti-depressants (or withdrawal from) and anti- anxiety meds cause mania, suicides, and mass murders and the anti-psychotics cause psychosis, at least when improperly given. The psychiatric industry’s meds actually cause the symptoms and “chemical imbalances” they pretend to treat. Beware, and it is an embarrassment for an entire industry to be deluded by their greed by big Pharm.

    Reply
    • I will certainly watch it. Yes, there is a very fine line between medication being beneficial in improving our quality of life, or as a way to control people who do not fit the mold, or as just plain poison. I am very concerned at the hysteria generated after this last episode, where the shooter was not even known to be mentally ill, of stigmatizing everyone with a DSM diagnosis as a potential mass murderer. I can see where someone might compare it to the treatment of the Jews.

      I don’t think that getting rid of meds is the answer, since my medications have proven life-saving for me. I do have a lot of hope that neuroscience is closing in on the genetic mutations responsible for some mental illnesses. I can envision a day when a doctor could order a blood test and know from the results which treatment would best fit that patient.

      Reply

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